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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship

Schoonewolff Mauricio Rug

Postgraduate student, Philosophy Department, Université Paris 8; Clinical Psychopathology Department, Université Rennes 2. Address: 2 Rue de la Liberté, 93526 Saint-Denis, France. E-mail: mauricio_rugeles@hotmail.com

Publications

Jacques Lacan and Leo Strauss: Political Persecution and the Clinic of the Unconscious / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 99-114
annotation:  The author of the article reconstructs the theoretical relationship between Leo Strauss’s Persecution and the Art of Writing and Jacques Lacan’s clinical perspective, found in his Seminar and in his Écrits. References to the works of Leo Strauss appear in Lacan’s texts when he speaks of structure and reading of the unconscious. For Lacan, the way the logic of unconscious repression works in the subject’s psyche can be compared to the way a writer bypasses censorship imposed by society on his texts, according to Leo Strauss. In the first part of the article, the author studies the reasons for the fact that the truth and the subject revealing it are always in a position of opposing the power: be it a state, a religious institution or super-ego. Mechanisms of writing in a situation of censorship are described by Leo Strauss in detail in Persecution and the Art of Writing: contradiction, logical fault, persistent refutation of a statement that the author actually seeks to advocate. Emphasis is made on the Symbolic, guided by the logic of the signifier, as understood by Lacan. In the article, the author isolates the references and concepts that Lacan borrows from Strauss, and analyzes in depth Strauss’s techniques for writing between the lines, in order to apply these techniques in analyzing the unconscious. Lacan uses Strauss to understand how to the unconscious functions and how to transmit truth (in this case, the subjective truth of the unconscious) from a position that is not pedagogical. The functioning of the psychoanalytical clinic is conditioned exactly by transmitting the truth that cannot be transmitted otherwise. Strauss’s work is based on medieval Jewish “philosophy,” specically Maimonides’s comments on Jewish theology. This detour is used by Lacan to exemplify his clinical approach.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Leo Strauss; political persecution; Maimonides; clinical psychoanalysis; writing; censorship
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