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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Dobson Andrew

Dobson Andrew

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Political Science at the University of Keele. Address: Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK . E-mail: a.n.h.dobson@keele.ac.uk.

Publications

Why Listening? / Logos. 2015. № 6 (108). P. 243-263
annotation:  Although valued in daily conversation, good listening has been almost completely ignored in the form of political conversation we know as «democracy», while speaking has been considered to play the main role since the time of Aristotle. Joining the recent perceptive democracy discussion in political philosophy (represented by Gideon Calder, Jeffrey Edward Green, and others), this article examines the reasons why so little attention has been paid to the listening aspect of democratic conversation. The author notes that the first of these reasons can be identified as power relations. The author draws on practical examples of how listening helped to solve serious conflicts (e. g. in restorative justice) or improve collective decision-making procedures (e. g. in activist communities) to offer an explanation of the role that listening might play in democracy. He assumes that listening should be at the heart or deliberative democracy rather than peripheral to it. Using multidisciplinary sources, with a special focus on feminist discussions, Aristotle’s Politics and its interpretation by Ranciere, the author also shows the extent to which listening is underrated. He argues that democracy’s promise will only be fulfilled when the right to speak and the right to be listened to are regarded as two sides of the same coin, when it is acknowledged that one is incomplete without the other, and when this aknowledgment is embedded in institutional practices.
Keywords: 

Dobson Andrew

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Political Science at the University of Keele. Address: Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK . E-mail: a.n.h.dobson@keele.ac.uk.

Publications

Why Listening? / Logos. 2015. № 6 (108). P. 243-263
annotation:  Although valued in daily conversation, good listening has been almost completely ignored in the form of political conversation we know as «democracy», while speaking has been considered to play the main role since the time of Aristotle. Joining the recent perceptive democracy discussion in political philosophy (represented by Gideon Calder, Jeffrey Edward Green, and others), this article examines the reasons why so little attention has been paid to the listening aspect of democratic conversation. The author notes that the first of these reasons can be identified as power relations. The author draws on practical examples of how listening helped to solve serious conflicts (e. g. in restorative justice) or improve collective decision-making procedures (e. g. in activist communities) to offer an explanation of the role that listening might play in democracy. He assumes that listening should be at the heart or deliberative democracy rather than peripheral to it. Using multidisciplinary sources, with a special focus on feminist discussions, Aristotle’s Politics and its interpretation by Ranciere, the author also shows the extent to which listening is underrated. He argues that democracy’s promise will only be fulfilled when the right to speak and the right to be listened to are regarded as two sides of the same coin, when it is acknowledged that one is incomplete without the other, and when this aknowledgment is embedded in institutional practices.
Keywords: 

Dobson Andrew

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Political Science at the University of Keele. Address: Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK . E-mail: a.n.h.dobson@keele.ac.uk.

Publications

Why Listening? / Logos. 2015. № 6 (108). P. 243-263
annotation:  Although valued in daily conversation, good listening has been almost completely ignored in the form of political conversation we know as «democracy», while speaking has been considered to play the main role since the time of Aristotle. Joining the recent perceptive democracy discussion in political philosophy (represented by Gideon Calder, Jeffrey Edward Green, and others), this article examines the reasons why so little attention has been paid to the listening aspect of democratic conversation. The author notes that the first of these reasons can be identified as power relations. The author draws on practical examples of how listening helped to solve serious conflicts (e. g. in restorative justice) or improve collective decision-making procedures (e. g. in activist communities) to offer an explanation of the role that listening might play in democracy. He assumes that listening should be at the heart or deliberative democracy rather than peripheral to it. Using multidisciplinary sources, with a special focus on feminist discussions, Aristotle’s Politics and its interpretation by Ranciere, the author also shows the extent to which listening is underrated. He argues that democracy’s promise will only be fulfilled when the right to speak and the right to be listened to are regarded as two sides of the same coin, when it is acknowledged that one is incomplete without the other, and when this aknowledgment is embedded in institutional practices.
Keywords: 
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