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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Gloukhov Alexei

Gloukhov Alexei

Alexei Gloukhov (born in 1972) is a philosopher (Moscow State University) and the translator of works by H. Arendt, N. Luhmann, F. Ankersmit. He studies political thought from Antiquity to present time and is the author of Plato’s Political Logic and ‘Overcoming of Platonism’ After Nietzsche (in print). alexei-gloukhov@rambler.ru

Publications

Philosophical Clarity: Heidegger Equals Hitler / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 91-120
annotation:  Publications over the last fifteen years, including Heidegger’s so-called Black Notebooks, his lectures and seminars from 1933–1935, and letters to his brother necessitate a reappraisal of the “Heidegger case.” New clarity has been reached regarding the significance of the “political” for his philosophy, his place in the intellectual avant-garde of the National-Socialist movement and, finally, the meaning of his “confession” of historical error. The remaining ambiguities persist due to the radical difference between the usual conception of a normal political reality that is shared by his critics and defenders alike and the style of thinking which was typical for that earlier historical period. Our accustomed static interpretation of events with its focus on the formal, ideological, or institutional elements of a normal political process must be distinguished from a dynamic interpretation of the “political.” Interest in Heidegger’s legacy is warranted because he provides his readers with a logic of “proper language” which opens a path to self-knowledge. The price to be paid for this benefit is that readers lose the distinction between their own language and Heidegger’s. Heidegger committed a similar error himself when he was negligent about distinguishing his language from Hitler’s. The conceptual convergence of Heidegger and Hitler serves as a warning about the danger in the kind of salvation Heidegger’s language provides to his readers in their pursuit of self-knowledge. The claim that in some respects “Heidegger equals Hitler” is not equivalent to the simple fallacy of a reductio ad Hitlerum. Further clarification of the relationship between thought and tyranny requires a return to classical political philosophy with its distinction between “proper language” and “common language” and to a tragic conception of truth.
Keywords:  Martin Heidegger; Adolf Hitler; Nazism; philosophy; tragedy; tyranny; proper language; self-knowledge
New Clarity in the “Heidegger Case”: A Round Table / Logos. 2018. № 3 (124). P. 205-231
annotation:  The release of the Russian language translation of the first volume of Heidegger’s Black Notebooks was the occasion of a round table discussion held in Moscow at the Muzeon Park of Arts with Alexei Gloukhov, Dmitriy Kralechkin, Vitaly Kurennoy, Michail Maiatsky, and Igor Chubarov as guest speakers moderated by Valery Anashvili. In addition to the central topics of the volume, various aspects of Heidegger’s thought that now need reappraisal in light of the Black Notebooks (which are currently being translated into various languages) were also considered. Some of those aspects are purely biographical, such as the question of Heidegger’s so-called “error” and his “turn” or Kehre. Other aspects have ramifications beyond Heidegger’s views on such issues as what the “received opinons” (e.g. on anti-Semitism) at the time were and how they were dealt with by philosophers, anti-modernism, the similarities and differences in the critique of modernity from the “left” and the “right,” and the relationships between philosophy and politics or authority, anti-Semitism, etc.
Keywords:  Martin Heidegger; Heidegger’s reception; anti-modernism; philosophy and power; anti-Semitism
Republicanism: Straightening of the Crooked Timber / Logos. 2018. № 2 (123). P. 248-268
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Philosophical Realism vs the Dogmatism of Schools: A Reply to Dmitriy Kralechkin / Logos. 2017. № 4 (119). P. 127-148
annotation:  This paper is a response to Dmitriy Kralechkin’s review of my book “Overlapping Waves. Political Logic and the Post-Nietzschean Overcoming of Platonism” (Moscow, 2014). In contrast to the reviewer’s opinion, my reasoning behind discussing Plato’s legacy was not that I wanted to rehabilitate his name in the history of philosophy. Rather, I aimed to overcome the dogmatism of the two dominant schools in contemporary philosophy, i.e. the continental (“post-Nietzschean”) and the analytical schools. My typological method of approaching the history of philosophy allows us to see the implicit possibilities and the limits of the post-Nietzschean intellectual wave, its obsession with the problem of freedom, and its ignorance of the problem of justice. Unlike the reviewer, I consider the shift in key terminology from the notion of freedom to the notion of difference not as an independent development within poststructuralism, but rather as a part of a global philosophic trend, whereby any exceptional speech of positive freedom is bound to inflate the old vocabulary and give incentives to the emergence of fresh metaphors. My interpretation of Plato’s political philosophy is not the same as my argument about the invariant problem of political reality, which is the problem of the mutual untranslatability between the language of anomic freedom and the language of communal justice. As we focus of the latter issue, this problem has become invisible today due to the dominance of the two philosophical schools. This diagnosis of the contemporary situation in philosophy is independent from my historical studies. Limiting the ramifications to Russia, it is safe to say that it would be nonsense for us to await salvation from a direct import of either continental or analytical political theories. Local constant distortion in favor of continental thought proves the absolute compatibility of those allegedly radical ideas with the preservation of the status quo. The reason for this, as well as for the impossibility of any direct import of normative political recipes, is the absence of what we may call the common language of thought in the local political community.
Keywords:  Plato; platonism; political philosophy; continental philosophy
Plato and ἀδύνατον: The Alibi of One Utopia / Logos. 2017. № 7 (0). P. 105-126
annotation:  The paper discusses the realistic application of Plato’s Kallipolis, providing results of recent studies on Greek colonization and cultural poetics. The Republic is just one among other colonization projects proposed by Athenian intellectuals in 4th century BC. Participants of the dialogue are quite familiar with real colonization practices. Socrates gives concise and clear indications on the typical recolonisation scenario to implement. The notoriously enigmatic saying that the ideal polis is to be found “nowhere on earth,” should be examined in the context of legendary tales about the foundations of colonies.
Keywords:  Plato; political philosophy; Republic; colonization; utopia; logos; impossible landscape; territorialization
Reality of Plato’s Philosophy/ Logos. 2012. № 6 (90). P. 5-15
annotation:  On the basis of Foucault’s concept of ‘reality of philosophy’ the paper presents an anti-utopian interpretation of Plato’s attempt to solve a key political problem which reemerged in the 20th century aft er philosophy had split in two dominant languages of thinking.
Keywords:  Plato, reality of philosophy, political thinking, metaphysics.
Plato and ἀδύνατον: the alibi of an utopia / Logos. 2011. № 4 (83). P. 101-119
annotation:  The paper discusses the realistic application of Plato’s Kallipolis, providing results of recent studies on Greek colonization and cultural poetics. The Republic is just one among other colonization projects proposed by Athenian intellectuals in 4th century BC. Participants of the dialogue are quite familiar with real colonization practices. Socrates gives concise and clear indications on the typical re-colonisation scenario to implement. The notoriously enigmatic saying that the ideal polis is to be found «nowhere on earth», should be examined in the context of legendary tales about the foundations of colonies.
Keywords:  Plato; political philosophy; Republic; colonization; utopia; logos; impossible landscape; territorialization
Leonard Miriam. Athens in Paris: ancient Greece and the political in postwar French Thought/ Logos. 2011. № 4 (83). P. 200-205
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