ru | En
PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Alemán Jorge

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis

Alemán Jorge

Emeritus member, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) and of Universidad de San Martín (UNSAM). Address: 430 Viamonte, 1053 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: jorgealemanlav@gmail.com

Publications

Philosopher’s Enjoyment / Logos. 2016. № 6 (115). P. 95-98
annotation:  In this article, the author analyses similarities and differences in method and practice between philosophy as a discipline and subjective position on one hand, and psychoanalysis as a clinical practice on the other hand. is article is the result of a debate between the author and Slavoj Žižek, held in Spain in 2015. e author questions the contemporary situation in which philosophers who study Jacques Lacan’s works and who employ his vocabulary seem to disregard the fact that psychoanalysis is primarily a clinical practice, and that Lacan’s theoretical constructions follow from his experiences with patients instead of preceding them. At the same time, it is extremely important that these theoretical constructions are of interest to the philosophical discipline; the author formulates reasons for and historical background of this interest. e author suggests that there are several similarities and differences between philosophy and psychoanalysis that incite representatives of both disciplines to read Lacan’s text, but to do so in dissimilar ways. Indeed, there are some similarities between philosophical and psychoanalytical disciplines concerning their method, for instance analyzing the logic of the signifier and dividing the subject in its certainties and identifications; Lacan partly bases his method on Socrates’ dialectics and on his relationship to his interlocutors. However, there is a fundamental difference in the subjective positions of representatives of these disciplines, which has an impact on their relationship to truth, knowledge, and to other subjects: philosophers enjoy and act as subjects, whereas analysts are not supposed to enjoy and are meant to embody the subject’s object, the object petit a.
Keywords:  Jacques Lacan; Slavoj Žižek; enjoyment; philosophy; unconscious; clinical psychoanalysis
All authors

© 1991—2019 Логос. Философско-литературный журнал.
Все права защищены.
Дизайн Юлия Михина, jmikhina@gmail.com,
программирование Антон Чубченко