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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Savino Giovanni

Savino Giovanni

Professor, Department of Liberal Arts, School of Public Policy, giovsav@gmail.com. Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), 82 Vernadskogo ave., 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Non-Russians’ Plots: Poles, Jews, Germans, and Ukrainians in the Minds of Russian Nationalists in the Early 20th Century / Logos. 2017. № 4 (119). P. 65-86
annotation:  On the cusp of the 19th and 20th centuries, the processes of nation-building and nation-oriented cultural hegemony began to play a significant role in the Russian Empire. The rise of nationalist movements in the borderlands of the empire had an impact on policies. Projects of nationalization began as early as the 1870s, with the progressive Russification of the Imperial Warsaw University, and the reformation of the Dorpat University into the Russian-speaking Iur’ev University. Reactions to the growing national unrest were not only of an administrative nature. They also had a cultural component, with the foundation of societies and organizations aimed to defend and promote the primacy of Russian interests, language and identity inside the imperial frame. Scholars pointed out that the Russian Nationalist project was fundamentally anti-imperial, but as the journal “Okrainy Rossii,” published from 1906 to 1912, demonstrated, the processes of nation- and empire-building went together at the time. The authors of the journal were intellectuals, bureaucrats and publicists who served or had origins in the Russian Empire’s Western Borderlands: Anton Budilovich (former provost of Iurev University), Platon Kulakovskii (professor of Russian philology at the Imperial Warsaw University) and others who started their academic career in the 1870s, a key moment for the Panslavism movement in the context of the Russo-Turkish war of 1877–1878. “Okrainy Rossii” was a tool, for this circle, to affirm their cultural and political views about the destiny of the empire and the definition of Russian identity in relation to the other national projects, such as the Polish, German, and Ukrainian.
Keywords:  Russian nationalism; Russian Empire; national identity; conspiracy theory; Okrainy Rossii

Savino Giovanni

Professor, Department of Liberal Arts, School of Public Policy, giovsav@gmail.com. Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), 82 Vernadskogo ave., 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Non-Russians’ Plots: Poles, Jews, Germans, and Ukrainians in the Minds of Russian Nationalists in the Early 20th Century / Logos. 2017. № 4 (119). P. 65-86
annotation:  On the cusp of the 19th and 20th centuries, the processes of nation-building and nation-oriented cultural hegemony began to play a significant role in the Russian Empire. The rise of nationalist movements in the borderlands of the empire had an impact on policies. Projects of nationalization began as early as the 1870s, with the progressive Russification of the Imperial Warsaw University, and the reformation of the Dorpat University into the Russian-speaking Iur’ev University. Reactions to the growing national unrest were not only of an administrative nature. They also had a cultural component, with the foundation of societies and organizations aimed to defend and promote the primacy of Russian interests, language and identity inside the imperial frame. Scholars pointed out that the Russian Nationalist project was fundamentally anti-imperial, but as the journal “Okrainy Rossii,” published from 1906 to 1912, demonstrated, the processes of nation- and empire-building went together at the time. The authors of the journal were intellectuals, bureaucrats and publicists who served or had origins in the Russian Empire’s Western Borderlands: Anton Budilovich (former provost of Iurev University), Platon Kulakovskii (professor of Russian philology at the Imperial Warsaw University) and others who started their academic career in the 1870s, a key moment for the Panslavism movement in the context of the Russo-Turkish war of 1877–1878. “Okrainy Rossii” was a tool, for this circle, to affirm their cultural and political views about the destiny of the empire and the definition of Russian identity in relation to the other national projects, such as the Polish, German, and Ukrainian.
Keywords:  Russian nationalism; Russian Empire; national identity; conspiracy theory; Okrainy Rossii
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