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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Rumyantzeva Mary

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization

Rumyantzeva Mary

Research Fellow, Laboratory for Cultural Studies, Centre for Fundamental Studies, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 8/2 3rd Kolobovskiy alley, 127051 Moscow, Russia. E-mail: mary.rumyantzeva@gmail.com.

Publications

Odo Marquard: the Scepticism and Agreement / Logos. 2016. № 4 (113). P. 165-179
annotation:  The article examines the intellectual biography and views of the greatest German polemist and philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century, Odo Marquard. From a historical philosophical point of view, Marquard is considered to be a member of the school of Joachim Ritter, who is mostly known as the initiator and chief editor of the fundamental encyclopedic text Historical dictionary of philosophy (Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie, 1971–2007). Marquard himself points out that his reception of Ritter’s philosophy was strongly influenced by the protests of 1968. His affirmative position towards the modern world is in part a consequence of these political events. Until this period, Marquard was deeply interested in the Frankfurt School and wrote sarcastic epigrams about Ritter’s philosophy. But after 1968, Marquard began to debate with the theories of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and Ritter’s philosophy of diremption (Entzweiung) became the object of his reflection as well as partially a polemical weapon against attempts to question the foundations of the liberal-democratic society of postwar West Germany. From a political point of view, Marquard’s philosophy is often considered to be a philosophy of liberal conservatism. Marquard points out that the history of the formation of liberal institutes plays a great role in modernity at large. This emphasis can be explained historically. Marquard belongs to the generation identified by Helmut Schelsky as a “skeptical generation.” This generation underwent radical historical breaks. Extreme politicization of everyday life under national socialism, World War II, the collapse of the Third Reich, and the experience of radical disorientation all contribute to Marquard’s skeptical position, which distances itself from any ideology or assertion, and pretends to be the absolute truth. According to Marquard, a skeptic aims not to search for a theory that could “reconcile” a conflict between differing points of view, but rather to uphold this conflict. In other words, the aim is to uphold a principle of separation of powers, where the powers are considered not only as political institutions, but also as assertions, theories, conceptions that could influence the position of an individual.
Keywords:  Odo Marquard; Joachim Ritter school; Frankfurt School; compensation theory; skeptical generation; conception of modernity; philosophical skepticism; modernization; historization
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