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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Rikitianskaia Maria

Rikitianskaia Maria

Research Assistant, Institute for Media and Journalism (IMeG), PhD student, mrikitianskaia@gmail.com. Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), Via Buffi 13, 6904 Lugano, Switzerland.

Publications

How Children Learned to Listen: The Formation of Radio Clubs in the Soviet Union / Logos. 2017. № 5 (120). P. 141-162
annotation:  The paper explores the formation of children’s radio clubs in the Soviet Union. The research approach is relatively new as it provides a “bottom up” perspective in the history of the radio, with a focus on ordinary people rather than inventors and politicians. The author tackles a significant problem for communication studies: how people reacted to innovations when the “old technologies” of today were first introduced. Primary sources for this historical research were radio-themed magazines and the print media of the 1920s. First, this paper draws attention to the birth of radio broadcasting from radiotelegraphy, usually defined in scholarship as a turn from “point-to-point” to “one-tomany” media. Secondly, the paper demonstrates that the state policy towards radio as a hobby after the October Revolution aimed to inspire the public through the publication of magazines and books, instructions about the installation and usage of radio equipment, as well as through the support of radio clubs for teenagers and children. Thirdly, the paper highlights the five key arenas for an institutional organization of children’s radio clubs: schools, palaces of young pioneers, orphanages, juvenile detention centers and villages, with an accompanying description of their main features and problems of radio installations. Fourthly, the content of children’s radio broadcasts — including concrete popular programmes — is described. Finally, the author identifies fundamental barriers to the spread of radio in the 1920s and the advantages of the new technology, such as the usability of the installations, portability of devices and wireless communication itself. As the main thesis, the author argues that the enthusiasts and amateurs were largely responsible for the spread of radio, while state policies supported the “radiofication” of the country mostly rhetorically.
Keywords:  media studies; radio history; wireless telegraph; radio broadcasting; radio amateurs; Soviet childhood; the 1920s

Rikitianskaia Maria

Research Assistant, Institute for Media and Journalism (IMeG), PhD student, mrikitianskaia@gmail.com. Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), Via Buffi 13, 6904 Lugano, Switzerland.

Publications

How Children Learned to Listen: The Formation of Radio Clubs in the Soviet Union / Logos. 2017. № 5 (120). P. 141-162
annotation:  The paper explores the formation of children’s radio clubs in the Soviet Union. The research approach is relatively new as it provides a “bottom up” perspective in the history of the radio, with a focus on ordinary people rather than inventors and politicians. The author tackles a significant problem for communication studies: how people reacted to innovations when the “old technologies” of today were first introduced. Primary sources for this historical research were radio-themed magazines and the print media of the 1920s. First, this paper draws attention to the birth of radio broadcasting from radiotelegraphy, usually defined in scholarship as a turn from “point-to-point” to “one-tomany” media. Secondly, the paper demonstrates that the state policy towards radio as a hobby after the October Revolution aimed to inspire the public through the publication of magazines and books, instructions about the installation and usage of radio equipment, as well as through the support of radio clubs for teenagers and children. Thirdly, the paper highlights the five key arenas for an institutional organization of children’s radio clubs: schools, palaces of young pioneers, orphanages, juvenile detention centers and villages, with an accompanying description of their main features and problems of radio installations. Fourthly, the content of children’s radio broadcasts — including concrete popular programmes — is described. Finally, the author identifies fundamental barriers to the spread of radio in the 1920s and the advantages of the new technology, such as the usability of the installations, portability of devices and wireless communication itself. As the main thesis, the author argues that the enthusiasts and amateurs were largely responsible for the spread of radio, while state policies supported the “radiofication” of the country mostly rhetorically.
Keywords:  media studies; radio history; wireless telegraph; radio broadcasting; radio amateurs; Soviet childhood; the 1920s
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