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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Pavlovets Mikhail

Pavlovets Mikhail

Associate Professor, Deputy Head, School of Philology, Faculty of Humanities, mpavlovets@hse.ru. National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 21/4 Staraya Basmannaya str., 105066 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Apology of Stalinism in Post-Soviet Literature Textbooks / Logos. 2017. № 5 (120). P. 65-86
annotation:  The article is devoted to the apology of Joseph Stalin and Stalinism in a number of post-Soviet literature textbooks. Their authors had a generally positive assessment of Stalin’s role, not only as the head of the Soviet state, but also as the “moderator” of the literary process in the Soviet Union. Stalin’s personal evaluation of concrete writers and their literary efforts — as well as, to some degree, the attitudes of these authors towards this Father of Nations — became an important factor in their inclusion into the classroom canon of textbooks or, on the contrary, discredited and excluded them from it. The authors of these books carefully selected and reinterpreted the facts to emphasize Stalin’s exceptional importance for the development of 20th century Russian literature. Thus, Stalin appeared as the most important figure of the literary process of the Soviet period, and the single method of Soviet literature which was being approved during his reign — “socialist realism” — as a natural extension and embodiment of humanistic traditions of Russian literary classics. In Soviet school textbooks, there is an attempt to create a concept of the history of the 20th century Russian literature on the ideological basis of the late Soviet “soil-bound” conservatism, and to conceptualize Stalinism as the natural continuation of pre-revolutionary political-ideological conservatism. Thus, the school subject “literature” is used as an ideological tool to indoctrinate the younger generation with a “national-patriotic” spirit. Moreover, this ideological line persisted in textbooks throughout the 1990s and 2000s with almost no adjustment, while their distribution was preferentially maintained by government agencies.
Keywords:  late Soviet conservatism; Soviet literature; Stalin; literature textbooks; scholastic literature canon

Pavlovets Mikhail

Associate Professor, Deputy Head, School of Philology, Faculty of Humanities, mpavlovets@hse.ru. National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 21/4 Staraya Basmannaya str., 105066 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Apology of Stalinism in Post-Soviet Literature Textbooks / Logos. 2017. № 5 (120). P. 65-86
annotation:  The article is devoted to the apology of Joseph Stalin and Stalinism in a number of post-Soviet literature textbooks. Their authors had a generally positive assessment of Stalin’s role, not only as the head of the Soviet state, but also as the “moderator” of the literary process in the Soviet Union. Stalin’s personal evaluation of concrete writers and their literary efforts — as well as, to some degree, the attitudes of these authors towards this Father of Nations — became an important factor in their inclusion into the classroom canon of textbooks or, on the contrary, discredited and excluded them from it. The authors of these books carefully selected and reinterpreted the facts to emphasize Stalin’s exceptional importance for the development of 20th century Russian literature. Thus, Stalin appeared as the most important figure of the literary process of the Soviet period, and the single method of Soviet literature which was being approved during his reign — “socialist realism” — as a natural extension and embodiment of humanistic traditions of Russian literary classics. In Soviet school textbooks, there is an attempt to create a concept of the history of the 20th century Russian literature on the ideological basis of the late Soviet “soil-bound” conservatism, and to conceptualize Stalinism as the natural continuation of pre-revolutionary political-ideological conservatism. Thus, the school subject “literature” is used as an ideological tool to indoctrinate the younger generation with a “national-patriotic” spirit. Moreover, this ideological line persisted in textbooks throughout the 1990s and 2000s with almost no adjustment, while their distribution was preferentially maintained by government agencies.
Keywords:  late Soviet conservatism; Soviet literature; Stalin; literature textbooks; scholastic literature canon

Pavlovets Mikhail

Associate Professor, Deputy Head, School of Philology, Faculty of Humanities, mpavlovets@hse.ru. National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE). Address: 21/4 Staraya Basmannaya str., 105066 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Apology of Stalinism in Post-Soviet Literature Textbooks / Logos. 2017. № 5 (120). P. 65-86
annotation:  The article is devoted to the apology of Joseph Stalin and Stalinism in a number of post-Soviet literature textbooks. Their authors had a generally positive assessment of Stalin’s role, not only as the head of the Soviet state, but also as the “moderator” of the literary process in the Soviet Union. Stalin’s personal evaluation of concrete writers and their literary efforts — as well as, to some degree, the attitudes of these authors towards this Father of Nations — became an important factor in their inclusion into the classroom canon of textbooks or, on the contrary, discredited and excluded them from it. The authors of these books carefully selected and reinterpreted the facts to emphasize Stalin’s exceptional importance for the development of 20th century Russian literature. Thus, Stalin appeared as the most important figure of the literary process of the Soviet period, and the single method of Soviet literature which was being approved during his reign — “socialist realism” — as a natural extension and embodiment of humanistic traditions of Russian literary classics. In Soviet school textbooks, there is an attempt to create a concept of the history of the 20th century Russian literature on the ideological basis of the late Soviet “soil-bound” conservatism, and to conceptualize Stalinism as the natural continuation of pre-revolutionary political-ideological conservatism. Thus, the school subject “literature” is used as an ideological tool to indoctrinate the younger generation with a “national-patriotic” spirit. Moreover, this ideological line persisted in textbooks throughout the 1990s and 2000s with almost no adjustment, while their distribution was preferentially maintained by government agencies.
Keywords:  late Soviet conservatism; Soviet literature; Stalin; literature textbooks; scholastic literature canon
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