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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Konovalov Georgy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy

Konovalov Georgy

MA student, dothesame1@gmail.com. Faculty of Social Sciences, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences (MSSES), 84 Vernadskogo ave., bldg 2, 119571 Moscow, Russia.

Publications

Corpus vs Object: Jean-Luc Nancy’s Ontology of Bodies as Object-Oriented / Logos. 2017. № 3 (118). P. 113-126
annotation:  The article examines the ontology of Jean-Luc Nancy. The author begins with the origins of Nancy’s intellectual intuition concerning the role of language, his critique of Kant, and his reflection on the relationship between literature and philosophy. There is no language, including the language of philosophy that can sufficiently express something about the world. Nancy describes language in his mature period of work not only as way to access things for humans, but also as a way in which things access each other. Particular attention is paid to concepts such as corpus (body) and différance. Following the ideas of Jacques Derrida, he shows that consciousness is involved in the world, and that it is part of the world because of the structure of the language itself. For Nancy, this means that consciousness is as much a part of the world as everything else. Elaborating on the concept of corpus, Nancy asserts that all things in the world (humans, lizards, diamonds, etc.) are equal. This concept of equality describes the relationship between language and things: everything interacts with everything else in language and through language. Everyone has access to the world equally; there is no privileged access. The author shows how Nancy juxtaposes his ideas to the ideas of Heidegger (the latter’s ontology presumes the human being as the preferred point of access). With the use of these concepts, Nancy equalizes things and humans in their philosophical status. Following from this, the author compares Nancy’s ontology with the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman. Finally, the author substantiates the claim that Nancy’s ontology is an object-oriented ontology.
Keywords:  corpus; body; différance; object; object-oriented ontology; Graham Harman; Jean-Luc Nancy
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