ru | En
PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Gorbunova Alla

Gorbunova Alla

Engineer, allagor85@yandex.ru. Institute of Laser and Welding Technologies (ILWT), Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), 29 Politechnicheskaya str., 195251 St. Petersburg, Russia.

Publications

Poetry, Experience and Knowledge / Logos. 2017. № 6 (121). P. 59-82
annotation:  The article raises the question of whether poetry is a form of knowledge. Thus, a step is made towards the problem-plagued field of philosophical thought dealing with such categories as knowledge and experience. The “cognitive” and “experiential or event-based” approaches to poetry are argued to be based on two different attitudes to truth: through language—in the case of knowledge—and through experience—if we understand poetry as an event. In order to understand the relationship of poetry and knowledge, the question of the relation between experience and language is raised at the same time. Here the major problem is the possibility of pre-predicative experience. It is the answer to the question regarding the possibility of such experience that determines how we define the relation of poetry to experience and knowledge. In the article, the differentiation between language and experience is proposed not as a dogmatic statement, but as a kind of “utopian” model: talking about poetry and knowledge, it is feasible to distinguish poetry comprehended as experience and poetry treated in its linguistic aspect. Poetry understood as experience produces a change in how we perceive the world. Poetry, concentrating on its work with language, enriches our linguistic resources. However, knowledge of the experiential measurement of poetry is much more problematic than knowledge of its linguistic dimension. To the extent to which poetry is a linguistic issue, it may be a subject of knowledge. However, there are areas where the “language” approach is irrelevant, “off the mark.” Thus, the event that makes up the substance of poetry, escapes. Both of these “experience-related” and “language-related” aspects are present in poetry simultaneously. In this sense, poetry can be a form of knowledge, but not just that: it affects reality differently—and more profoundly—in its experiential event-driven form than it does in its epistemic aspect.
Keywords:  poetry; knowledge; experience; truth; event

Gorbunova Alla

Engineer, allagor85@yandex.ru. Institute of Laser and Welding Technologies (ILWT), Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), 29 Politechnicheskaya str., 195251 St. Petersburg, Russia.

Publications

Poetry, Experience and Knowledge / Logos. 2017. № 6 (121). P. 59-82
annotation:  The article raises the question of whether poetry is a form of knowledge. Thus, a step is made towards the problem-plagued field of philosophical thought dealing with such categories as knowledge and experience. The “cognitive” and “experiential or event-based” approaches to poetry are argued to be based on two different attitudes to truth: through language—in the case of knowledge—and through experience—if we understand poetry as an event. In order to understand the relationship of poetry and knowledge, the question of the relation between experience and language is raised at the same time. Here the major problem is the possibility of pre-predicative experience. It is the answer to the question regarding the possibility of such experience that determines how we define the relation of poetry to experience and knowledge. In the article, the differentiation between language and experience is proposed not as a dogmatic statement, but as a kind of “utopian” model: talking about poetry and knowledge, it is feasible to distinguish poetry comprehended as experience and poetry treated in its linguistic aspect. Poetry understood as experience produces a change in how we perceive the world. Poetry, concentrating on its work with language, enriches our linguistic resources. However, knowledge of the experiential measurement of poetry is much more problematic than knowledge of its linguistic dimension. To the extent to which poetry is a linguistic issue, it may be a subject of knowledge. However, there are areas where the “language” approach is irrelevant, “off the mark.” Thus, the event that makes up the substance of poetry, escapes. Both of these “experience-related” and “language-related” aspects are present in poetry simultaneously. In this sense, poetry can be a form of knowledge, but not just that: it affects reality differently—and more profoundly—in its experiential event-driven form than it does in its epistemic aspect.
Keywords:  poetry; knowledge; experience; truth; event
All authors

© 1991—2020 Логос. Философско-литературный журнал.
Все права защищены.
Дизайн Юлия Михина, jmikhina@gmail.com,
программирование Антон Чубченко