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PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Bryant Levi

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives

Bryant Levi

PhD in Philosophy, Professor of Philosophy at Collin College in the Dallas — Fort Worth metropolitan area. Address: 9700 Wade Boulevard, Frisco, TX 75035, USA. E-mail: lbryant@collin.edu.

Publications

Towards a Finally Subjectless Object / Logos. 2014. № 4 (100). P. 275-292
annotation:  The article addresses the basic mapping of modern epistemology and ontology, and blueprints the project of “onticology” as a version of object-oriented ontology. The author points to the fact that realists as well antirealists both share the assumption of the epistemological privilege of subject, and take as a premise different interpretations of the access to the reality. But the fundamental subject-object difference has its blind spots conditioned by the structure of distinction itself. This structure is treated by the author as a relation between “marked” and “unmarked.” Traditionally, objects were being assigned to the void sphere of “unmarked.” On the contrary, onticology with its “flat ontology” supposes that there is nothing except objects, and subjects are included to the multitude of “objects.”
Keywords:  onticology, flat ontology, objects, marked and unmarked, realism, antirealism, Latour, collectives
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