ru | En
PHILOSOPHICAL
LITERARY
JOURNAL
ISSN 0869-5377
Author: Aronova Elena

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.

Aronova Elena

Assistant Professor, Department of History, earonova@history.ucsb.edu.
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), 93106-9410 Santa Barbara, CA, USA.

Publications

Geophysical Datascapes of the Cold War: Politics and Practices of International Data Centers / Logos. 2020. № 2 (135). P. 41-92
annotation:  The International Geophysical Year or IGY (1957–1958) was conceived against a background of nuclear secrecy intensified by Cold War political tensions, but the IGY provided the impulse for constructing the distinct data regime which took hold in Soviet and American World Data Centers in the 1950s and 1960s — a regime that turned data into a form of currency traded by the political players in the Cold War. This essay examines that data regime in detail by taking up the issues of secrecy and access, sharing and exchange, accumulation and archiving, and finally the handling and use of the IGY data. Features of the IGY’s data centers, such as the notion of centralized storage of open data freely accessible to users from around the world, played an important role in establishing the practices of data governance that continue today in the form of Big Data. These practices, however, were outcomes of the politics, visions, and accompanying technologies that were embedded in and supported by the political culture of the Cold War. By revisiting the drawbacks and challenges that accompanied that Big Data moment in the early Cold War, this essay explores the multiple meanings of data and the ways in which data circulated in a veiled Cold War political economy that ran parallel to their use (or neglect) in the pursuit of knowledge.
Keywords:  International Geophysical Year; Cold War; World Data Centers; Big Data; information technologies; data exchange.
All authors

© 1991—2020 Логос. Философско-литературный журнал.
Все права защищены.
Дизайн Юлия Михина, jmikhina@gmail.com,
программирование Антон Чубченко